Nov 02, 2019 / 18:05

Vietnam’s aviation authority allows 15-inch Macbook Pro onboard

The Hanoitimes - In case these devices have damaged lithium battery replaced by another one that is not included in the list of recall, passengers would be allowed to carry them on board.

Starting November 15, 15-inch Macbook Pro models sold and produced between September 2015 and February 2017 are allowed to be on board of commercial flights on the condition of having battery replacement or in switch-off mode, according to the Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam (CAAV).

 Illustrative photo.

Additionally, the CAAV issued a ban on transportation of damaged lithium batteries or electronic devices using faulty lithium batteries that are subject to manufacturers’ recall, aiming to ensure safety for air transportation activities.

Following the decision, the CAAV bans all domestic and foreign airlines from operating flights to and out of Vietnam transporting lithium batteries and electronic devices having these batteries that subject to a recall from manufacturers.

In case these devices have damaged lithium battery replaced by another one that is not included in the list of recall, passengers are allowed to carry them on board.

Otherwise, all these devices would only be permitted to be on board if they are switch off during the flight.

As this instruction becomes effective starting November 15, CAAV’s previous ban on 15-inch Macbook Pro model sold between September 2015 and February 2017 on board of commercial flights under any circumstances would be discarded.

The ban, which became effective since August 21, was in line with a similar ban of the US Federal Aviation (FAA) on those laptops, following Apple’s June recall of this model for free battery replacement to prevent the risk that these batteries may overheat and pose safety threats. 

Under the CAAV’s instruction, passengers and flight attendants would not be allowed to bring these types of MacBook Pros on board, with the restriction covering both carry-on and checked luggage.

Passengers that deliberately violate the instruction could be subject to penalty and denied permission to board a plane.