31st Sea Games - Vietnam 2021 Covid-19 Pandemic
Aug 22, 2022 / 18:45

Young designers hit fashion stage in Hanoi

The collections are on display at the London College for Design & Fashion, 98 To Ngoc Van St, Hanoi until the end of this month.

As many as 40 young fashion designers and traders attended Graduation fashion week of London College for Design and Fashion which took place last weekend at Melia Hotel, Hanoi with the theme of Re:birth.

 The exhibition showcases the making process of new collections. Photo: Tra My

Making a comeback after a 2-year interruption due to the pandemic, Re:birth is one of LCDF Hanoi's most special Graduation Fashion Weeks ever featuring 50 collections that embody different thoughts of young GenZ designers.

“After two years of being affected by the pandemic and going through a period of isolation, our students have formed unique perspectives on the modern world. Re:birth is an opportunity to celebrate creativity and freedom, to demonstrate forward-thinking. Graduation Fashion Week 2022 will bring a wave of young creative designers with a shared vision of promoting positivity, fresh thinking and change in the fashion industry,” LCDF Hanoi's May Cortazzi said.

True to the main theme of Re:birth, the collections were divided into 3 t thematic sub-groups representing the change in reincarnation of the GenZ: Re:vive, Re:grow and Re:new.

Re:vive includes collections expressing the designer's new awareness of community issues (plastic surgery trends, underworld...); nature (lessons learned from caterpillars, parasites…), and environment (using natural fibers, recycled fabrics, natural dyes,…)

Re:grow gathers collections inspired by the designers' own self-discovery process (psychology of unrequited love, ambiguous and floating mental states... ). In addition, there are sets of pieces that show the designer's daring when predicting human life in the future.

Re:new brought together collections that respect and renew the values ​​of the past and traditions such as classic paintings, Vietnamese literary works, the beauty of ethnic costumes, inventions from the war, and imprints of the centralized economy period (1954-1986). among others.

Behind the scenes, there are some trivia about the artistic creation process. Designer Phạm Trung Anh did not spend a dime on fabric because her collection Dear Lipesk, is made from more than 30 pairs of jeans provided by relatives, while designer Đào Thu Trang hand-stitched thousands of denim pieces together for her work Coup D’etat. Some outfits of Nguyễn Thanh Hiền’s Fly to The Sky weigh up to 10kg because they include metal parts and electric motors.

 A design in the collection “Illusion” by Hanoi-based designer Yến Nhi.

Hanoi-based designer Yến Nhi brought to the show “Illusion” inspired by paintings of Mexican artist, Octavio Ocampo. These are works that are painted on a canvas but if viewed from different angles, will create different illusions. “Our life is the same. The same thing and phenomenon may have many different ways to feel and evaluate,” Nhi said.

The collection designs feature striking, strong, and seductive colors. The designer uses laser cutting techniques and collage of prints to create special illusion effects. The origami-inspired design structure offers the ability to change the same design into different looks.